Remember in September – A Daily Post for National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month Post #4

September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month.

Every day in the month of September I will post something related to suicide to increase awareness, educate and prevent suicide. It may be some important facts, an educational video, a music video, other videos, quotes, stories and anything to increase awareness, educate and give hope to everyone who has suicidal thoughts, suicidal ideations or is a survivor of a friend or family member that died by suicide.

I must confess that this first week in September will be difficult for me to make a great post a day. I am working today and my son is getting married on Friday, September 8th. I will be very busy getting my house ready, finishing up on shopping, preparations and family coming to visit. Also, it is the first day of school on Tuesday, September 5th for my youngest daughter. It is her last first day of High School. That is exciting too. So this first week in September is going to be a good, but busy week for me.

I think the cause and message is so important that I want to make a post a day about suicide prevention awareness. It is important and crucial for all of us to do our part and I want to make a post a day on my blog every day in the month of September for National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month.

My first week in September is going to be busy, but I promise you that as the month progresses and I have more time, the posts (hopefully) will continue to get better and more beneficial for everyone. That is where my heart is.

Please remember in September to check out my blog every day for important and inspiring information about suicide prevention.

We must make our voices heard very loud and strong about mental illness, mental illness stigma and suicide prevention. It is critical. It is crucial. Each life is priceless. We must prevent suicides and save lives.


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Suicide Statistics

While this data is the most accurate we have, we estimate the numbers to be higher. Stigma surrounding suicide leads to underreporting, and data collection methods critical to suicide prevention need

  • Each year 44,193 Americans die by suicide
  • For every suicide, 25 attempt
  • Suicide costs the US $51 Billion annually to be improved.
  • Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the US

Additional Facts About Suicide in the US

  • The annual age-adjusted suicide rate is 13.26 per 100,000 individuals.
  • Men die by suicide 3.5x more often than women.
  • On average, there are 121 suicides per day.
  • White males accounted for 7 of 10 suicides in 2015.
  • Firearms account for almost 50% of all suicides.
  • The rate of suicide is highest in middle age — white men in particular.

In 2015, the highest suicide rate (19.6) was among adults between 45 and 64 years of age. The second highest rate (19.4) occurred in those 85 years or older. Younger groups have had consistently lower suicide rates than middle-aged and older adults. In 2015, adolescents and young adults aged 15 to 24 had a suicide rate of 12.5.

Suicide Rates by Race/Ethnicity

In 2015, the highest U.S. suicide rate (15.1) was among Whites and the second highest rate (12.6) was among American Indians and Alaska Natives (Figure 5). Much lower and roughly similar rates were found among Asians and Pacific Islanders (6.4), and Blacks (5.6). Note that the CDC records Hispanic origin separately from the primary racial or ethnic groups of White, Black, American Indian or Alaskan Native, and Asian or Pacific Islander, since individuals in all of these groups may also be Hispanic.

Suicide Methods

In 2015, firearms were the most common method of death by suicide, accounting for a little less than half (49.8%) of all suicide deaths. The next most common methods were suffocation (including hangings) at 26.8% and poisoning at 15.4%.

Suicide Attempts

No complete count is kept of suicide attempts in the U.S.; however, each year the CDC gathers data from hospitals on non-fatal injuries from self-harm.

494,169 people visited a hospital for injuries due to self-harm. This number suggests that approximately 12 people harm themselves for every reported death by suicide. However, because of the way these data are collected, we are not able to distinguish intentional suicide attempts from non-intentional self-harm behaviors.

Many suicide attempts, however, go unreported or untreated. Surveys suggest that at least one million people in the U.S. each year engage in intentionally inflicted self-harm.

Females attempt suicide three times more often than males. As with suicide deaths, rates of attempted suicide vary considerably among demographic groups. While males are 4 times more likely than females to die by suicide, females attempt suicide 3 times as often as males. The ratio of suicide attempts to suicide death in youth is estimated to be about 25:1, compared to about 4:1 in the elderly.

 

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This is the link to the entire article. There is a lot of very interesting facts and information with graphics and charts that I could not put on my post. I would suggest checking it out. It is an excellent article.

References: American Foundation For Suicide Prevention – AFSP’s latest data on suicide are taken from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Data & Statistics Fatal Injury Report for 2015. Suicide rates listed are Age-Adjusted Rates.

 

 

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